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Kernel Wakelock ("wlan_rx_wake")

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Joesyr

Joesyr

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 09:09 PM #21

Found this thread searching just now as I started having this problem today. I swapped two routers around in my house to get a better signal in the rooms I'm usually in when home, and while that's been nice for my laptop, it looks like the new router is draining my phone's battery. The problem router is running ddwrt and I'm going to play with some of the settings people have proposed here and see if I can pinpoint anything in particular. For science!

Attached is a screencap just to illustrate the drain and how drastic it can be. A rough timeline so you know what you're looking at: I was mostly home today. The first three-fifths of the graph are idle drain while I was sleeping or home in the morning. Pretty clean data; dips when I used the phone, nice even slope when it was idling. Trace up from the "46s" on the timestamp; at that dip, I installed the router, promptly went out for a bit (drain from using phone while out), and then came back. After that dip, it's still largely idle drain, but the slope speaks for itself.

Premptive edit: Doodled on picture for added clarity.

Postemptive edit: Hmm, competing theory: Where I'm sitting right now, I've got two routers broadcasting a signal. One is good (about -50 rssi), the other varies wildly (from better than the steady one all the way up to the -80 range). I wonder if it's not actually a problem of the phone switching between the two of them when they're both in range. Maybe the first course of action will be to just unplug the further one and see if the supposedly bad router plays nice when it's alone.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Screenshot_2012-07-12-00-08-07.png
  • Screenshot_2012-07-12-00-08-07.png

Edited by Joesyr, 11 July 2012 - 09:59 PM.

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creaky24

creaky24

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 04:58 AM #22

OK, so here's a screen shot of some of the captures made by Shark from last night. I honestly have no idea what any of this means or what I should be looking for. Any help is appreciated!

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  • SharkScreen.jpg

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atomicminded

atomicminded

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 07:03 AM #23

OK, so here's a screen shot of some of the captures made by Shark from last night. I honestly have no idea what any of this means or what I should be looking for. Any help is appreciated!


Honestly, I would probably start with the network log app, first. Install it, and let it run for a while with the screen off.

See if there are any apps that are transferring data behind your back, in a major way, first. Also, pay attention to the app named "KERNEL" (lol.)

the kernel handles all the DHCP and low level traffic. If the kernel has a lot of activity, then shark captures might be in order.
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creaky24

creaky24

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 08:56 AM #24

Honestly, I would probably start with the network log app, first. Install it, and let it run for a while with the screen off.

See if there are any apps that are transferring data behind your back, in a major way, first. Also, pay attention to the app named "KERNEL" (lol.)

the kernel handles all the DHCP and low level traffic. If the kernel has a lot of activity, then shark captures might be in order.


OK, thanks, atomic. I'll get some network logs tonight and post them later or tomorrow. Really appreciate the help.

Sent from my Liquified Nexus
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creaky24

creaky24

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 06:08 PM #25

So it looks like download manager/downloads are snagging 428 packets while other apps are receiving like 6. Wondering what the next course or action might be....

Sent from my Liquified Nexus
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timdor

timdor

Android Lover

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 04:41 AM #26

I also hate to bump an old thread but I was hunting down this problem last night and I seemed to have found an answer. I downloaded Network Log from the play store and started looking through the data this app provided. I found most of my wifi traffic was to/from my desktop PC downstairs on port 17500. Turns out, DropBox was trying LanSync and it was apparently polling my phone and keeping it awake.

Killing LanSync and/or the DropBox app fixed the problem for me. Hope this helps anyone else having the same issue!
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